Thursday, October 27, 2016

Prototyping in Design and Fabrication

This week, students in Introduction to Design and Fabrication created quick, rough prototypes of liquid containers for their specific user. Using craft supplies like duct tape, paper cups, straws and hot glue, students constructed prototypes to use as they pitched their ideas to the class. Students were engaged in the activity, as they "built to learn," one of the basic principles of Design Thinking. By constructing an object, they make their ideas real and learn what works and what doesn't. They also then have an object for others to respond to as they talk about how it solves their user's needs. See the photos below for the process of prototyping and some of the quick, rough prototypes. And click these link link link links  to see videos of the build!












Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Introduction to Design and Fabrication: Brainstorming!


 This week in Introduction to Design and Fabrication, students learned about brainstorming rules: defer judgement, go for quantity, 'headline' your ideas, encourage wild ideas, stay focused, build on the ideas of others, and be visual. They did some warm up improvisation exercises, including 30 circles, which asked students to transform 30 circles into recognizable objects in three minutes, to get their creative juices flowing. And then they brainstormed. They were brainstorming ideas to create better liquid containers for their user based on their user's needs.


 Once they had written some ideas on post-its individually, they shared with their team with a "Yes, and..." mindset, adding ideas and building on one another's ideas. Next step is to organize their ideas and select some to prototype.


Thursday, October 6, 2016


We have a short week, so students are continuing to work on projects. In Introduction to Design and Fabrication, students continue to work on their user profiles, enlarging them and filling out the details. 







In Introduction to Engineering, students continued work on their exploded assemblies of objects chosen for the take-apart assignment.